Future of Social Security

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Will Social Security Retire Before You Do?

People have traditionally seen Social Security benefits as the foundation of their retirement planning programs. The Social Security contributions deducted from workers’ paychecks have, in effect, served as a government-enforced retirement savings plan.

However, the Social Security system is under increasing strain. Better health care and longer life spans have resulted in an increasing number of people drawing Social Security benefits. As the baby boom generation (those born between 1946 and 1964) has begun to retire, even greater demands are being placed on the system.

In 1950, there were 16.5 active workers to support each person receiving Social Security benefits. In 2015, there were only 2.8 workers supporting each Social Security pensioner. And it is projected that there will be only 2.1 active workers to support each Social Security beneficiary by 2035.1

Although Social Security payments are typically adjusted for inflation, your own income and expenses may rise at a faster pace. And you might have to wait longer than you anticipated to qualify for full benefits.

It used to be that full benefits were available after you reached age 65. But since 2003, the age to qualify for full benefits has been increasing on a graduated scale based on year of birth. By 2027, the age to qualify for full Social Security benefits will have increased to age 67, where it is currently scheduled to remain.

That means you may have to wait longer to qualify for full Social Security benefits to start replacing a smaller percentage of your pre-retirement income.

When calculating the income you will have in retirement, you might recognize that Social Security benefits may play a more limited role. Some financial professionals suggest ignoring Social Security altogether when developing a retirement income plan.

Source: 1) Social Security Administration, 2015

Note: The Social Security Administration no longer mails an annual estimated benefit statement to all taxpayers. You can view your statement online by visiting www.ssa.gov/myaccount and creating your own personal Social Security account on the Social Security website. 

The information in this article is not intended to be tax or legal advice, and it may not be relied on for the purpose of avoiding any federal tax penalties. You are encouraged to seek tax or legal advice from an independent professional advisor. The content is derived from sources believed to be accurate. Neither the information presented nor any opinion expressed constitutes a solicitation for the purchase or sale of any security. This material was written and prepared by Emerald. © 2016 Emerald Connect, LLC

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The information contained in this article is for general use and while we believe all information to be reliable and accurate, it is important to remember individual situations may be entirely different. Therefore, information should be relied upon only when coordinated with professional tax and financial advice. Neither the information presented nor any opinion expressed constitutes a representation by us or a solicitation of the purchase or sale of any insurance or securities products and services. Written and published by EmeraldConnect.